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Form 1040 ES 2023

 

In this article, you will learn:

  1. What Is Form 1040 ES?
  2. Who Must File Form 1040 ES?
  3. 1040 ES Due Dates
  4. IRS Estimated Tax Payment Form
  5. 1040 ES Instructions
  6. 1040 ES Payment
  7. 1040 ES Payment Voucher
  8. 1040 ES Where To Mail

All U.S. citizens or resident aliens must file an annual federal income tax return with the IRS in Form 1040 depending on their gross income, filing status, age, and whether they are dependent. These filing requirements apply even if the taxpayers do not owe any tax on their gross income, that is, the income they receive in the form of money, goods, property, and services that aren’t exempt from tax.

Further, there are three variants to this form. These include Form 1040 NR, Form 1040 SR, and Form 1040 X. The taxpayers who are considered “non-resident aliens” for tax purposes must file Form 1040-NR.

Then, the taxpayers who are 65 or older or who were born before January 2, 1958, must file Form 1040 SR to report their income tax.

Finally, the taxpayers who need to make corrections on Form 1040, Form 1040A, and Form 1040EZ tax returns that have been filed previously must file Form 1040 X.

Now, besides these variants, there are various separate attachments to Form 1040, which are typically called “Schedules”.

Also, there are other specialized IRS and SSN forms that taxpayers must attach to Form 1040 along with 1040 Schedules to paper file the annual income tax return with the IRS. These attachments and the specialized forms that taxpayers must attach to Form 1040 would depend upon the taxpayer.

One such specialized form that taxpayers must attach to Form 1040 return is Form 1040-ES. In this article, we are going to discuss what is Form 1040 ES 2023, when you should file 1040 ES, and how you must file Form 1040 ES with the IRS.

Also Read: eCommerce Taxation 101: The Basics You Need To Know

What Is Form 1040 ES?

The income tax is a pay-as-you-go tax. This means the taxpayers must pay the income tax as they earn or receive income during the year. Accordingly, there are two ways in which taxpayers can pay their income tax. These include withholding tax and estimated tax.

The withholding tax method is the one in which the taxpayers’ employer withholds income tax from their pay. Tax may also be withheld from certain other income, such as pensions, bonuses, commissions, and gambling winnings. Thus, the amount that the employer withholds is paid to the IRS in the taxpayers’ name. Form W-4 is used to figure out the correct amount of withholding the taxpayers can claim.

The other method to pay federal income tax is the estimated tax method. The estimated tax method is the one in which the taxpayers pay tax on income that is not subject to withholding. Such income may include earnings from self-employment, interest, dividends, rent, alimony, etc. Thus, if taxpayers earn such income, they must pay an estimated tax on such income.

Now, there can be cases wherein taxpayers may voluntarily choose to pay income tax through an estimated tax method rather than withholding tax.

This can be the case when the amount of income tax withheld from the taxpayer’s salary or pension is not enough or the employer refuses to withhold income tax from noncash wages and other wages not subject to withholding.

In such a scenario, the taxpayers may have to make estimated tax payments. Further, self-employed individuals doing business for themselves need to make estimated tax payments. Thus, the estimated tax method is used to pay not only income tax but self-employment tax and alternative minimum tax as well.

Now to calculate and pay estimated tax, the taxpayers use Form 1040-ES. In a nutshell, Form 1040-ES is a tax form that taxpayers use to calculate and pay estimated tax on income that isn’t subject to withholding.

Alan Chen, CPA at Freecashflow.io, helping eCommerce businesses with their tax and accounting

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Who Must File Form 1040 ES?

All U.S. citizens and resident aliens, non-resident aliens, and residents of the five territories of the U.S. must make estimated tax payments if they satisfy the following conditions:

  • Taxpayers expect to owe at least $1,000 in tax after subtracting their withholding and refundable credits.
  • They expect their withholding and refundable credits to be less than the smaller of:
    • 90% of the tax to be shown on their taxable year’s tax return or
    • 100% of the tax shown on their previous year’s tax return provided the previous year’s tax return covers all 12 months.

Note that an alien is any individual who is not a U.S. citizen or U.S. national and a nonresident alien is an alien who has not passed the green card test or the substantial presence test. A U.S. citizen is a person born in the United States regardless of the tax or immigration status of a person’s parents.

Furthermore, a person born outside the United States may also be a U.S. citizen at birth if at least one parent is a U.S. citizen and has lived in the United States for a specified period.

In case the taxpayer is a farmer, fisherman, or a higher-income taxpayer, in such cases the above-mentioned percentages may be different.

Also, the taxpayers need not pay estimated tax in the taxable year if they were U.S. citizens or resident aliens for all of the previous year and had no tax liability for the complete 12-month previous year. Note that taxpayers are considered to have no tax liability in the previous year when their total tax is zero or they didn’t have to file an income tax return.

1040 ES Due Dates

Taxpayers can pay all of their estimated tax by April 18 of the taxable year or in four equal amounts by the dates shown below.

Payment Due Date
1st Payment April 18
2nd Payment June 15
3rd Payment September 15
4th Payment January 16

Note that the taxpayers need not make the payment due January 16 if they file their taxable year’s tax return by January 31 and pay the entire balance due with their return.

Remember that the date of the U.S. postmark is considered the date of payment if taxpayers mail their payment postmarked by the due date. Also, taxpayers may have to pay a penalty for underpaying their taxes if their payments are late or they didn’t pay enough.

Note that the taxpayers may be charged a penalty on each underpayment for the number of days it remains unpaid. As mentioned earlier, taxpayers may have to pay a penalty if they don’t pay enough estimated tax for the year or they don’t make the payments on time or in the required amount. Taxpayers may also have to pay a penalty if they have an overpayment on their tax return. Furthermore, under certain conditions, the penalty may be waived.

IRS Estimated Tax Payment Form

The following is the IRS Form 1040 ES or the Estimated Tax Payment Form.

Form 1040 ES 2023

Here is the IRS Estimated Tax Payment Worksheet with the help of which the taxpayers will calculate their Estimated Taxes.

Form 1040 ES 2023

1040 ES Instructions

This section covers the instructions that taxpayers must follow to fill out their Estimated Tax Payment Form or Form 1040-ES. Let’s discuss the instructions pertaining to each of the components of Form 1040-ES one by one.

Line 1. Total Income

To calculate the adjusted Gross Income, the taxpayers must first calculate the Total Income. The Total Income is the one that includes all the income taxpayers expect to receive during the year and the income that is subject to withholding. However, the Total Income does not include the income exempt from tax.

Also, the taxpayers must include the amount of expected taxable benefits in their total income if they expect to receive social security or tier 1 railroad retirement benefits during the taxable year. Taxpayers can use Worksheet 2-2 to calculate any social security and railroad retirement benefits.

Once the taxpayers calculate the expected total income, the next step to calculate adjusted gross income is to subtract all of the adjustments the taxpayers expect to take on their taxable year’s tax return.

In case the taxpayers are self-employed and expect to have income from self-employment, they must use Worksheet 2-3 to calculate their expected self-employment tax and the allowable deduction for self-employment tax. Once the taxpayers estimate these amounts, they must include them in their expected adjustments to income.

Furthermore, if the taxpayers file a joint return and both the taxpayers and their spouses have net earnings from self-employment, then each of them must complete a separate worksheet.

Line 2. Expected Taxable Income

In Line 2, the taxpayers must showcase the expected total of the itemized deductions in Line 2a if they plan to itemize deductions. Itemized deductions are the deductions that taxpayers can claim on Schedule A of Form 1040.

However, if the taxpayers don’t plan to itemize deductions, they must enter their standard deduction in Line 2a. To calculate their standard deduction, the taxpayers can use Worksheet 2-4

Thus, the taxpayers can reduce their expected Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) by either their expected itemized deductions or their standard deduction.

Note that for some individual taxpayers, the standard deduction is zero. The standard deduction will be zero if the taxpayers:

  • File a separate return and their spouse itemizes deductions
  • Are a dual-status alien, or
  • File a return for a period of less than 12 months because they change their accounting period

Then, in line 2c, the taxpayers must enter the estimated amount of the qualified business income deduction if they can take such a deduction on their qualified business income from a qualified trade or business.

Further, in line 2c, the taxpayers must add the amounts showcased in lines 2a and 2b to calculate the total deduction they can claim against their taxable income.
2b. If you can take the qualified business income deduction, enter the estimated amount of the deduction

Line 3. Adjusted Gross Income

In Line 3, the taxpayers must subtract the amounts showcased against Line 2c from Line 1, that is, subtract deductions from the total income to calculate the Adjusted Gross Income.

Line 4. Expected Taxes

In Line 3, the taxpayers must showcase the amount of tax that they need to pay on their Adjusted Gross Income that they calculated in Line 3. To figure out the tax on the adjusted gross income, the taxpayers must use the taxable year’s Tax Rate Schedules. The following image showcases the tax rate schedules for 2023.

Form 1040 ES 2023

Note that if the taxpayers have any qualified dividends or a net capital gain, or expect to exclude or deduct foreign earned income or housing, they must use Worksheets 2-5 and Worksheets 2-6 to figure the appropriate tax amount.

The following is Worksheet 2-5 to calculate Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax.

Form 1040 ES 2023

Form 1040 ES 2023

Here is Worksheet 2-6 to calculate the Foreign Earned Income Tax.

Form 1040 ES 2023However, the taxpayers must follow the instructions below in case they may have to use a different method to figure out their estimated tax.

a. Tax On Child’s Investment Income

The taxpayers must use a different method to determine the amount of tax to be paid on the income of the following children who have more than $2,500 of investment income.

  • Children under age 18 at the end of the taxable year.
  • The following children if their earned income is not more than half their support:
    • Children age 18 at the end of the taxable year.
    • Children who are full-time students at least age 19 but under age 24 at the end of the taxable year

The taxpayers can check out Publication No. 929, Tax Rules for Children and Dependents to get more information on this.

b. Tax On Net Capital Gain

Note that the regular income tax rates for individuals do not apply to a net capital gain. Instead, the taxpayer’s net capital gain is taxed at a lower maximum rate. The term “net capital gain” means the amount by which taxpayers’ net long-term capital gain for the year is more than their net short-term capital loss.

As mentioned earlier, if Line 1 of Form 1040 ES includes a net capital gain or qualified dividends, the taxpayers must use Worksheet 2-5 to calculate the tax amount. Furthermore, the tax rate on taxpayers’ capital gains and dividends will depend on their income.

c. Tax On Claim Of Foreign Income Deduction

If the taxpayers expect to claim the foreign earned income exclusion or the housing exclusion or deduction on Form 2555, they must calculate the estimated tax using Worksheet 2-6.

Total your expected taxes (line 6). Include on line 6 the sum of the following. 1. Your tax on line 6. 2. Your expected alternative minimum tax (AMT) from Form 6251. 3. Your expected additional taxes from Form 8814, Parents’ Election To Report Child’s Interest and Dividends, and Form 4972, Tax on Lump-Sum Distributions. Any recapture of education credits.

Line 5. Alternate Minimum Tax (AMT)

Some taxpayers have certain types of income that receive favorable treatment, or who qualify for certain deductions, under the tax law. Such taxpayers are required to pay the Alternate Minimum Tax (AMT) as reflected in Form 6251.

These tax benefits can significantly reduce the regular tax of such taxpayers. Further, there is a limit to which taxpayers paying AMT can take benefits and reduce their total tax amount.

Thus, in Line 5 of Form 1040-ES, the taxpayers are required to showcase the AMT tax amount as reflected in Form 6251.

Line 6. Expected Total Tax

In Line 6 of Form 1040-ES, add the amounts showcased in Lines 4 and 5 and add to this amount any other taxes that taxpayers expect to include in the total on Form 1040 or 1040-SR.

This means that Line 6 of Form 1040-ES must showcase the sum of the following items:

  • Taxpayers’ expected total of income tax on the Adjusted Gross Income (AGI).
  • The taxpayers expected alternative minimum tax (AMT) from Form 6251.
  • Taxpers’ expected additional taxes from Form 8814, Parents’ Election To Report Child’s Interest and Dividends, and Form 4972,
  • Tax on Lump-Sum Distributions.
  • Any recapture of education credits.

Line 7. Credits

Line 19 and Schedule 3, lines 1 through 6z, of Form 1040 or 1040-SR, showcase the types of credits that are allowed. The taxpayers must check out these sections to determine the total credits that they can claim.

Line 8. Net Tax

In Line 8, the taxpayers are going to calculate and showcase the net tax amount they need to pay. To calculate the net tax amount, the taxpayers must subtract Line 7, total credits, from Line 6, the expected total income tax. The taxpayers can also use their previous tax return for guidance on credits.

Also, if the amount of credits as showcased in Line 7 of Form 1040-ES is more than the expected total tax as showcased in line 6, then the taxpayers must simply enter 0 on Line 8 and go to the next step.

Line 9. Self-Employment Tax

Self-employment tax is a tax that includes Social Security and Medicare taxes primarily for individuals who work for themselves. This is similar to the Social Security and Medicare taxes withheld from the pay of most wage earners.

Note that the Social Security and Medicare taxes withheld of most wage earners are calculated by the employers. However, self-employment tax is a tax that self-employed individuals have to figure themselves using Schedule SE of Form 1040 or 1040-SR.

Also, self-employed individuals can deduct the employer-equivalent portion of their SE tax while determining their adjusted gross income. On the other hand, wage earners cannot deduct Social Security and Medicare taxes.

Now, if taxpayers and their spouses make joint estimated tax payments and both of them have self-employment income, then each of them has to determine their respective self-employment tax separately. Once taxpayers calculate the self-employment tax, they need to enter the total on line 9.

Note that when estimating their taxable year’s net earnings from self-employment, the taxpayers must use only 92.3% of their total net profit from self-employment.

Line 10. Other Taxes

In Line 10, the taxpayers must showcase the other expected taxes they need to pay. Other taxes may include:

  • Additional tax on early distributions from:
    • An IRA or other qualified retirement plan
    • A tax-sheltered annuity
    • A modified endowment contract entered into after June 20, 1988
  • Household employment taxes if:
    • Taxpayers will have federal income tax withheld from wages, pensions, annuities, gambling winnings, or other income;
    • Taxpayers would be required to make estimated tax payments even if they didn’t include household employment taxes when figuring their estimated tax
  • Amounts entered on Schedule 2 of Form 1040, lines 14 through 17z. But these amounts do not include the following:
    • Line 17b, recapture of a federal mortgage subsidy
    • Line 17k, tax on excess golden parachute payments;
    • Line 17m, the excise tax on insider stock compensation from an expatriated corporation;
    • Line 17n, look-back interest due under section 167(g) or 460(b) of the Internal Revenue Code.
  • Repayment of the first-time homebuyer credit
  • 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax applied to the taxpayers’ combined Medicare wages and self-employment income and/or their RRTA compensation. Provided such an amount exceeds the amount listed in the following chart, based on the taxpayer’s filing status.Note that Medicare wages and self-employment income are combined to determine if taxpayers’ income exceeds the threshold. Also, if taxpayers suffer a self-employment loss, it should not be considered for purposes of this tax.Furthermore, the taxpayers should compare any Railroad Retirement Tax Act (RRTA) compensation separately to the threshold.Note that the taxpayers’ employer is responsible for withholding the 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax on Medicare wages or RRTA compensation it pays to the taxpayers more than the threshold in the taxable year. Thus, if the taxpayers need to make an estimated payment, they must consider this withholding.
Filing Status Threshold Amount
Married filing jointly $250,000
Married filing separately  $125,000
Single  $200,000
Head of household  $200,000
Qualifying surviving spouse $200,000

 

  • Taxpayers may be subject to a 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT) on the lesser of their net investment income or the excess of their Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) over the amount listed in the following chart, based on their filing status.
Filing Status Threshold Amount
Married filing jointly  $250,000
Married filing separately $125,000
Single $200,000
Head of household $200,000
Qualifying surviving spouse $250,000

Lines 11a to 11c. Total Taxes

In Line 11a, the taxpayers must showcase the total tax amount after considering the net tax amount after adjusting credits in the expected total tax as showcased in Line 8, the amount of self-employment tax as showcased in Line 9, and the amount of other taxes as showcased on Line 10.

Then, in line 11b, the taxpayers must mention the amount of refundable credits. The refundable credits include the earned income credit, additional child tax credit, fuel tax credit, net premium tax credit, refundable American opportunity credit, and section 1341 credit.

Once they calculate and showcase the amount of refundable credits in line 11b, the taxpayers must determine the total estimated tax. To calculate the total estimated tax, the taxpayers must subtract the refundable credits showcased in line 11b from the total tax amount as showcased in line 11a.

After subtracting 11b from 11a, if the amount turns out to be zero or less, the taxpayers must enter 0 in line 11c.

Lines 12a to 12c. Total Taxes

On lines 12a through 12c, the taxpayers must determine the total amount they must pay for the taxable year, through withholding and estimated tax payments, to avoid paying a penalty.

Line 12a

There’s a general rule for tax payments the taxpayers are required to make. The total amount that taxpayers must pay is the smaller of:

  • 90% of their total expected tax for the taxable year, or
  • 100% of the total tax as shown on their previous year’s tax return. Note that the taxpayer’s previous year’s tax return must cover all 12 months.

However, there are some special rules for higher-income taxpayers and farmers and fishermen. The higher income taxpayers must replace 110% for 100% in the second point above if their AGI for the previous year was more than $150,000 ($75,000 if their filing status for the taxable year is married filing separately). This rule does not apply to farmers and fishermen.

If at least two-thirds of taxpayers’ gross income for the previous year or the taxable year is from farming or fishing, such taxpayers’ required annual payment is the smaller of:

  • 662/3% (0.6667) of their total tax for the taxable year, or
  • 100% of the total tax shown on their previous year’s return

Lines 12b and 12c

Line 12b showcases the previous year’s total tax amount of the taxpayers. Whereas, Line 12c showcases the amount of annual tax that the taxpayers are required to pay. This amount is smaller than 12a or 12b.

Also note that if the taxpayers don’t prepay, through income tax withholding and estimated tax payments, at least the amount as mentioned on line 12c, they may owe a penalty for not paying enough estimated tax.

Thus, to avoid a penalty, the taxpayers must ensure that they estimate the tax on line 11c as accurately as possible.

Lines 13 to 14. Total Estimated Tax Payments Needed

Line 13 showcases the income tax withheld and estimated to be withheld during the taxable year. This would include income tax withholding on pensions, annuities, certain deferred income, etc.

Note that the taxpayers’ expected withholding for the taxable year on line 13 includes the income tax that they expect to be withheld from all sources including wages, pensions annuities, etc.

Further, it includes excess social security and tier 1 railroad retirement tax the taxpayers expect to be withheld from their wages and compensation. For this purpose, taxpayers will have excess social security or tier 1 railroad retirement tax withholding for the taxable year only if their wages and compensation from two or more employers are more than $160,200.

In addition to the above, the withholding also includes Additional Medicare Tax taxpayers expect to be withheld from their wages or compensation. Their employer is responsible for withholding the 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax on Medicare wages or RRTA compensation it pays to them more than $200,000.

Then, on Line 14a, the taxpayers must subtract the taxes withheld as showcased on Line 13 from the amount of annual tax that the taxpayers are required to pay as showcased on Line 12c. If the difference turns out to be 0 or less than 0, then the taxpayers are not required to pay estimated taxes. However, if the difference is more than 0, then the taxpayers must go to the next line 14b.

Thus, taxpayers must use lines 13 and 14a to figure the total estimated tax they may be required to pay for the taxable year. Further, the taxpayers should also subtract their expected withholding from their required annual payment as determined in line 12c.

The taxpayers can pay this difference in four equal installments. Also, the taxpayers don’t have to pay estimated tax if:

  • The difference between line 12c and line 13 is zero or less, or
  • The difference between line 11c minus line 13 is less than $1,000.

Line 12b reflects the difference between tax withholding as showcased in line 13 and the amount of annual tax that the taxpayers are required to pay as showcased in line 12c. If this difference is less than $1000, then the taxpayers are not required to make estimated tax payments. However, if the difference is more than $1000, the taxpayers are required to figure out the required amount and go to line 15.

Lines 15. Total Estimated Tax Payments Need

Line 15 indicates the amount of tax that taxpayers need to pay on the due date and mentions the same on their estimated tax voucher if they are paying by check or money order. Accordingly, the taxpayers are required to enter on line 15 ¼ of line 14a and subtract from this amount any previous year’s overpayment that they are applying to this installment. They must showcase this amount on their estimated tax payment voucher(s) if the taxpayers are paying by check or money order.

1040 ES Payment

There are three ways in which taxpayers can make the 1040 ES payment. These include 1040 ES Payment Online, Payment By Phone, and Payment By Cash. Let’s discuss each of these methods.

I. 1040 ES Payment Online

Paying online is the most convenient and secure way to pay income tax. To pay online, taxpayers should access the IRS website at IRS.gov/Payments.

Further, they must use their SSNs to pay their estimated taxes online. Taxpayers must use their SSN even if their SSN does not authorize employment or if they have been issued an SSN that authorizes employment and taxpayers lose their employment authorization.

Note that once the SSA issues SSNs to the taxpayers, the IRS will not issue ITIN. Also, if taxpayers receive their SSN after they have used ITIN for filing and paying their previous taxes, they must stop using ITIN and start using SSN.

To pay income tax online, the taxpayers can use the following methods:

1. Online Account

The taxpayers can make tax payments through their online account, including balance payments, estimated tax payments, or other types. Besides making these payments, the taxpayers can also see their payment history and other tax records through their Online Account. To access their online account, the taxpayers must go to IRS.gov/Account.

2. IRS Direct Pay

The second way through which taxpayers can pay their taxes is via online transfers directly from their checking or savings account at no cost. To make payments through online transfers, taxpayers must go to IRS.gov/Payments.

3. Pay by Card

Another way through which taxpayers can pay taxes is through their debit or credit card. To make payments through a card, the taxpayers must go to IRS.gov/Payments. Note that if taxpayers choose to make payments through a debit or a credit card, they will have to pay a convenience fee that is charged by the service providers.

4. Electronic Fund Withdrawal

Electronic Fund Withdrawal (EFW) is another way through which taxpayers can make their tax payments. EFW is an integrated e-file or e-pay option. The taxpayers can use this option only when they file their federal taxes electronically using tax preparation software, through a tax professional, or the IRS at IRS.gov/Payments.

5. Online Payment Agreement

Taxpayers can use this method to pay taxes if they are unable to pay their taxes in full by the due date of their tax return. To make tax payments through an online payment agreement, taxpayers must apply for an online monthly installment agreement at IRS.gov/Payments. Note that the moment taxpayers complete the online process, they will receive notification of whether their agreement has been approved. Further, the taxpayers will be charged a user fee to make payments through an online payment agreement.

II. Pay By Phone

Another safe and secure way to make payment electronically is via phone. The taxpayers can use one of the following methods to pay taxes by phone: (i) call one of the debit or credit card service providers, or (ii) use the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS).

a. Debit or Credit Card

To make payment of taxes through a debit or a credit card, the taxpayers must call one of the IRS’s service providers. Each service provider charges a fee that varies by provider, card type, and payment amount. The following are the service providers that taxpayers can call:

ACI Payments, Inc.
888-UPAY-TAXTM (888-872-9829)
fed.acipayonline.com

Link2Gov Corporation
888-PAY-1040TM (888-729-1040)
www.PAY1040.com

WorldPay US, Inc.
844-PAY-TAX-8TM (844-729-8298)
www.payUSAtax.com

b. EFTPS

To enroll in EFTPS or to get more information about EFTPS, the taxpayers must visit EFTPS.gov or call 800-555-4477.

Further, taxpayers who have a hearing or speech disability must contact EFTPS using Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS) by dialing 711. Once dialed in, they must provide the TRS assistant the 800-555-4477 number above or 800-733-4829.

If taxpayers need to obtain additional information about EFTPS, they must check out Publication No. 966.

c. Mobile Device

The taxpayers can also pay through their mobile devices. For this, they have to download the IRS2Go app.

III. Pay By Cash

The taxpayers can also make payments for their taxes through cash. Paying through cash is an in-person payment option for individual taxpayers. IRS’s retail partners provide this option with a maximum of $1,000 per day per transaction.

To make a cash payment, the taxpayers must first register themselves online at fed.acipayonline.com, which is the IRS’s official payment provider. Note that taxpayers must not send cash payments through the mail.

1040 ES Payment Voucher

The taxpayers can also send their payments towards federal taxes in the form of checks or cash through postal mail using an estimated tax payment voucher called the 1040 ES Payment Voucher.

However, the IRS website cautions the taxpayer to use alternative methods to make payment for taxes before using the tax payment voucher method. That’s because they proclaim that the safest and easiest way to make tax payments is through online payment methods.

However, if the taxpayers choose to mail in their tax payment, they must know that there is a separate estimated tax payment voucher for each due date. The due date is shown in the upper right corner of the voucher. The taxpayers must complete and send in the voucher only if they are making a payment by check or money order. Furthermore, if the taxpayers and their spouses plan to file separate returns, they must file separate vouchers instead of a joint voucher.

To complete a tax payment voucher, the taxpayers must follow the steps below:

a. Taxpayer Details

The taxpayers must either print or type their name, address, and SSN in the space provided on the estimated tax payment voucher. As mentioned earlier, the taxpayers must enter their SSN even if their SSN does not authorize employment or if the taxpayers have been issued an SSN that authorizes employment and they lose their employment authorization.

If the taxpayers have an ITIN instead of an SSN, they must enter their ITIN wherever their SSN is requested on the tax payment voucher.

Also, the taxpayers must enter their spouse’s name and SSN if they are filing a joint voucher. The taxpayers must list the names and SSNs in the same order on the joint voucher as they will list them on their joint return.

b. Tax Amount

The next step to fill up the tax payment voucher is to enter only the amount of tax that the taxpayers are sending in by check or money order in the box provided on the estimated tax payment voucher.

Note that while making estimated tax payments, the taxpayers must take into account any previous year’s overpayment that they choose to credit against their taxable year’s tax. However, the taxpayers should not include the overpayment amount in this box.

c. Check Bearer

The taxpayers must make their check or money order payable to “United States Treasury.” Note that they must not send cash. Further, the taxpayers must enter the tax amount on the right side of the check in the format $ XXX.XX to help process their payment accurately.

Also, taxpayers should not use dashes or lines when entering the amount on their checks.

d. Other Details On Check

The taxpayers must also enter “20XX Form 1040-ES” and their SSN on their check or money order. In case they are filing a joint estimated tax payment voucher, the taxpayers must enter the SSN that they will show first on their joint return.

e. Enclose Voucher With Payment

Once the taxpayers follow all the steps above, they must enclose their payment with the estimated tax payment voucher rather than stapling or attaching payment with the voucher.

1040 ES Where To Mail

The taxpayers must mail their estimated tax payment voucher and check or money order to the address shown below for the place where they live. Note that taxpayers should not mail their tax returns to the following addresses or send an estimated tax payment without a payment voucher.

Also, taxpayers should not mail their estimated tax payments to the address shown in the Form 1040 instructions. In case taxpayers need more payment vouchers, they can make a copy of one of their unused vouchers.

Furthermore, the taxpayers must include the P.O. box number in the address if they want to properly deliver their estimated tax payment to a P.O. box. Also, only the U.S. Postal Service can deliver to P.O. boxes. Therefore, the taxpayers cannot use a private delivery service to make estimated tax payments required to be sent to a P.O. box.

The following are the addresses of the place they live and where they need to mail their tax payment vouchers.

If Taxpayers Live In.. They Must Send Their Tax Payment Vouchers to.. 
Alabama, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 1300 Charlotte, NC 28201-1300
Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 931100 Louisville, KY 40293-1100
Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Oregon, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 802502 Cincinnati, OH 45280-2502
A foreign country, American Samoa, or Puerto Rico (or are excluding income under Internal Revenue Code 933), or use an APO or FPO address, or file Form 2555 or 4563, or are a dual-status alien or nonpermanent resident of Guam or the U.S. Virgin Islands Internal Revenue Service

P.O. Box 1303

Charlotte, NC 28201-1303

Guam: Bona fide residents* Department of

Revenue and Taxation

Government of Guam

P.O. Box 23607

GMF, GU 96921

U.S. Virgin Islands: Bona fide residents* Virgin Islands Bureau

of Internal Revenue

6115 Estate Smith Bay

Suite 225

St. Thomas, VI 00802

Note that if the taxpayers are bona fide residents, they must prepare separate vouchers for estimated income tax and self-employment tax payments. Further, such taxpayers must send the income tax vouchers to the address of bona fide residents and the self-employment tax vouchers to the address of non-bona fide residents.

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How To File Taxes For Shopify Store?

How To File Taxes For Shopify Store? In this article, you will learn: Shopify Taxes Shopify Store Owners Need To Pay Shopify Income Tax: Forms,

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